Dr. Martin Luther King, ‘I Have a Dream’ Speech, 50 Years Ago Today

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MLK’s Speeche

Video: Martin Luther King – I Have A Dream Speech- August 28, 1963

I Have a Dream Speech
Martin Luther King’s Address at March on Washington
August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C.

When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"

I think Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. would have been very disappointed at today’s Washington event in his honor.  Why?  For people who constantly espouse equality and the need to work together, they are the last ones to include anyone who disagrees with them, conservatives, Republicans, and especially black conservatives.  That was very evident again today….

From the Washington Examiner today:  Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., the only black person serving in the United States Senate, wasn’t invited to the event commemorating the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s march on Washington, though a host of Democratic luminaries spoke on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. “Senator Scott was not invited to speak at the event,” Greg Blair, a spokesman for the South Carolina lawmaker,…

Apparently George W Bush was invited but is recovering from surgery…..aside from his invite, it appears that the invites went mostly to Democratic “luminaries”…not successful black people from all walks of life and politics.

To my knowledge, there was a host of very notable black conservatives/Republicans who are were overlooked. Why weren’t they allowed to speak and share their experiences and insight?

Below are just a few suggestions of black conservative leaders, off the top of my head, that could and should have been included in today’s event:

JC Watts:  The first African-American Republican U.S. Representative from south of the Mason-Dixon line since Reconstruction, elected in 1994. Pastor and college quarterback star at University of Oklahoma.

Condoleezza Rice – The first female African-American secretary of state.

Clarence Thomas – The 2nd black Supreme Court judge, grew up poor in Savannah, the only black in his high school. He left priesthood seminary after MLK was killed because he “thought the church did not do enough about racism.”

Herman Cain –  A successful business man, Presidential candidate, radio host and was raised in “The Bluff” area of Atlanta where Dr. King lived at one time.

Mia Love – The former mayor of Sarasota Springs, Utah, who spoke at the Republican National Convention and the first female Haitian-American elected official in Utah County, Utah.

Allen West – Former career military officer and US Congressman from Florida and current contributor for Fox News and PJ Media.

And how about a whole list of black conservative media personalities, authors, entertainers and political activists?  How about Dr. Ben Carson… brain surgeon and author?  And unless I missed her, I didn’t even see Dr. King’s niece, Dr. Alveda King, who does amazing work for the black community but doesn’t necessarily walk the Progressive liberal line, at the event.

Gulag Bound:  Prior in Gulag Bound, we see that Dr. King was pursued by Marxist collectivists and for a time in college cohabited with them; but he threw off that degrading ideology, and its atrocious, semi-genocidal culture of death.

But the pressure and progress by the Left… not part of MLK’s dream continues…

Video: Steve King: "Marxist" Obama Encouraging Women "Not to Have a Man in the House"

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Excerpted from Mediaite: Many of the speakers commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington this past weekend talked of continuing the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., but Bill O’Reilly didn’t buy it, saying that if Dr. King was alive today, he would be shocked to see what has become of the civil rights movement. He accused people like Al Sharpton of being corporate sellouts and not tackling the real issues plaguing the black community, instead keeping their speeches “heavy on grievance.” Keep reading

50 Year Anniversary of Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream Speech… 

Dr. Ben Carson: MLK Would Be Alarmed by Black America

Finally, Conservative Doesn’t Cave When Called Racist

Juan Williams: Songs of the Summer of 1963 . . . and 2013

Fifty years ago Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. culminated his March on Washington with a powerful speech at the Lincoln Memorial that touched America’s heart..

Here is the full speech with audio.  -  Off-Site audio mp3 of Address

h/t to the American Thinker…

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we’ve come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds."

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we’ve come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: "For Whites Only." We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until "justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream."¹

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest — quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of "interposition" and "nullification" — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; "and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together."2

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

And this will be the day — this will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning:

My country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.

Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride,

From every mountainside, let freedom ring!

And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.

And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.

Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.

Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.

But not only that:

Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.

From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

Free at last! Free at last!

Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!

You be the judge…

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About Ask Marion

I am a babyboomer and empty nester who savors every moment of my past and believes that it is the responsibility of each of us in my generation and Americans in general to make sure that America is as good or even a better place for future generations as it was for us. So far... we haven't done very well!! Favorite Quotes: "The first 50 years are to build and acquire; the second 50 are to leave your legacy"; "Do something that scares you every day!"; "The journey in between what you once were and who you are becoming is where the dance of life really takes place". At age 62 I find myself fighting inoperable uterine Cancer and thanks to the man upstairs and the prayers from so many people including many of my readers from AskMarion and JustOneMorePet... I'm beating it. After losing our business because of the economy and factors related to the re-election of President Obama in 2012 followed by 16-mos of job hunting, my architect-trained husband is working as a trucker and has only been home approximately 5-days a month since I was diagnosed, which has made everything more difficult and often lonely... plus funds are tight. Our family medical deductible is 12K per year for two of us; thank you ObamaCare. But thanks to donations from so many of you, we are making ends meet as I go through treatment while taking care of my father-in-law who is suffering from late stage Alzheimer's and my mother-in-law who suffers from RA and onset dementia as well as hearing loss, for which there are no caretaker funds, as I continue the fight here online to inform and help restore our amazing country. And finally I need to thank a core group of family, friends, and readers... all at a distance, who check in with me regularly. Plus, I must thank my furkids who have not left my side through this fight. You can see them at JustOneMorePet.
This entry was posted in Choices, Dumbing Down of America, Events, Freedom, History, Knowledge Is Power, low-informed voters, manipulation of the public, Politics, Remembering, Watch the Other Hand, You Be the Judge and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Dr. Martin Luther King, ‘I Have a Dream’ Speech, 50 Years Ago Today

  1. Derrick says:

    You didn’t need an invite to go. You just go. Those people mentioned do not in anyway represent the black communities which is why they they don’t get elected out of them and when they run for national election get no support from black communities. But lack of an invite is an excuse. The nobody in the crowd had an invite yet they found a way to figure out where DC was and made it.

  2. Pingback: Progressive Racism and Stupidity Know No Bounds | askmarion

  3. Pingback: Using Power… Like LBJ | askmarion

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